ARTS

Patchogue pastor pens book with new view on loneliness

Linda Leuzzi
Posted 6/11/20

Rev. Dwight Lee Wolter’s new book, “Loneliness Book of World

Records,” offers a creative way of looking at lone- liness, especially

in this pandemic. As he writes, it can …

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ARTS

Patchogue pastor pens book with new view on loneliness

Posted

Rev. Dwight Lee Wolter’s new book, “Loneliness Book of World

Records,” offers a creative way of looking at loneliness, especially in this pandemic. As he writes, it can present an entryway to spiritual and emotional openness and a way to lighten up.

Wolter, pastor of the Congregational Church of Patchogue, allows access to that illumination via short, funny, interesting chapters that include titles like Loneliest Tree in the World.

You think you’re lonely? How about a lone spruce tree that grows on Campbell Island in sub-Antarctic New Zealand, 170 miles from the nearest tree, that endures rain 325 days a year and gale-force winds 100 days a year! The flip side? This tree is now 30 feet tall and grows five to 10 times faster than normal. It isn’t going to give in to the elements, a testament that adversity can nurture spiritual growth, as the author points out.

Wolter pops in humorous asides regularly: if an award were to be given out to this tree, its theme song would be Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive.”

Did you know that the loneliest sound in the world is a wolf howl? But it’s not because they are lonely. This large, distinctive canine call is a way to communicate with its pack.

Of course, The loneliest number in the world is number one, but Wolter comments that singer-composer Harry Nilsson wrote the song “One” as a creative response to loneliness.

Other chapters include Loneliest Word in the World, Loneliest Phrase in the World and Loneliest Country in the World. That would be the Divided Island of Ireland.

There is the Campaign to End Loneliness Across Northern Ireland (really!) as well as cuddle cafes and Rent-a-Family options in Japan (really!).

Chapter 21 ends the book with the Loneliest Song in the World. The overall winner is Hank Williams’s “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” and then loneliest songs by category, including tunes from The Beatles, Roy Orbison, Kelly Clarkson, Dolly Parton and Miles Davis.

Whether you find yourself humming to some of the songs you remember, discover new ones, Google for further information about the revelatory facts, or meditate on Wolter’s wisdom, this 63-page book will make you feel better.

The message: Feeling lonely can have its upside.

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